JAVA
09:00 - 10:00
Registration
One day I thought that JEE6 lacks a light and easy to use framework for the presentation layer. Why didn’t anybody write a RoRa or grails that would simply be based on the JEE6 container?
Then I set my thoughts into motion. In this presentation I will show how simple this task turned out to be – using CDI, JAX-RS etc. and of course I’ll show that Asamal works!
We’ll go through the elements of the web framework – content, making a template, POST and GET forms, AJAX, Security – I’ll show how most of these things could be accomplished with existing JSRs.
Coding with JEE6 can be as pleasant as coding with Rails :-)
Tomasz works in Softwaremill as a CEO – developer / member – founder. He manages teams but since he strongly believes in Agile, he is one of the programmers at the same time.
He has certificates from many different fields. He is the co-leader of the Warsaw JUG, besides JAVA he is interested in writing his own compilers.
He is a bit sarcastic from time to time, he likes skiing and canoeing. Visit his twitter and blog
In Poland, we still don’t talk enough about functional languages. In the minds of developers, the languages that are on JVM are no competition for Java, Groovy or Scala. During the presentation Jacek would like to present functional language, Clojure. Jacek will focus on practice and not bore people with syntax. He’d rather show it as a tool for creating applications run form the command line (a la scripts) and web applications and most of all for simplifying concurrent applications. Many programmers hear “Clojure” and immediately think of many, many brackets just because Clojure is as a member of LISP group of languages. In fact, Clojure has less brackets then Java! As a Java practitioner Jacek was asking himself a question “Why do we need functional languages on JVM?” Finally, after a lot of time spent trying to crack Clojure, he thinks he knows the answer and this will be the core of his presentation. Those languages are present on JVM anyway, why not use them for our advantage and simplify building concurrent applications and web applications. It can make a great library that will make concurrent programming so much easier. For developers that don’t use JVM but work with LISP or Haskell it can be a chance to enter JVM and use the variety of available solutions.
Jacek Laskowski is the leader and founder of the Warsaw JUG. He is interested in Java primary release (Java SE) and Enterprise (Java EE), and from more than a year he is fascinated with functional programming with Clojure (and sometimes F #). Publishes his thoughts on the Polish blog Jacek Laskowski and English blog Japila :: verba, Exempla trahunt. You can always find his brief thoughts @jaceklaskowski. Is a frequent speaker at Polish conference, which he treats with honor and presents his own views. He will be grateful for any comments about public activity.
11:50 - 12:10
Coffee Break
Modern application frameworks promote a POJO-based programming model, and POJOs are inherently easy to unit test. But how can we effectively integration test our application outside the container while still getting as close to a production-like environment as possible? This session will show attendees how to approximate a target production environment using JUnit and the Spring TestContext Framework to drive fast, repeatable, "out-of-container" integration tests. To simulate a live system, the session will cover open source integration testing techniques such as the use of in-memory databases, JMS providers, and Servlet containers as well as mock SMTP and FTP servers. These techniques are not limited to Spring based applications and can be applied to help integration test any modern Java application.

Sam Brannen is a Senior Software Consultant with over 14 years' experience and co-founder of Swiftmind, a software consulting agency in Zürich, Switzerland. At Swiftmind Sam helps international clients achieve best practices in agile software development, architecture, design, implementation, and testing of enterprise Java applications using the Spring Framework and a plethora of open source technologies. In his consulting role, Sam most enjoys leading workshops, code reviews, coaching, and training clients.



Sam is a popular speaker at conferences on Java, Spring, and OSGi. He is also an active core committer for the Spring Framework, lead author of "Spring in a Nutshell" from O'Reilly, author of the Spring TestContext Framework, and was previously a core developer of SpringSource dm Server (a.k.a., Eclipse Virgo).

Over the years, Sam has helped clients build applications in various business sectors ranging from e-commerce to banking, retail, automotive, and social communities. When not in front of his computer, Sam enjoys traveling and spending time with family and friends.
Code Quality (aka Internal Quality) is so hard to define that if you ask about it to 10 programmers you'll surely end with 10 different answers. While there are already many formal definitions, this talk tells the story of how our team improved the quality of code. The talk focus on the practical side, showing several simple techniques. The ultimate goal is to define an easy and quick way to determine the quality of code and how to improve it.
Uberto is a dedicated programmer since he received a ZxSpectrum as Christmas present. He wrote two books and many articles on Borland Delphi and Linux. He is also a test infected Agile enthusiast and a speaker at many conferences in Italy on Delphi, Agile and Java. He also likes and contributes to open source software on any language and platform that sounds interesting. Currently is working at Vodafone, leading a team of passionate developers to build backend services for the mobile. During the nights he studies and writes code for http://www.netnumero.com, a solution for online accounting based on GWT and the cloud (GAE).
13:45 - 14:45
Lunch
Spring 3.x and MVC Testing Support This session will give attendees an overview of the new testing features in Spring 3.1 and 3.2 as well the new Spring MVC test support. Sam Brannen will demonstrate how to use the Spring TestContext Framework to write integration tests for Java-based Spring configuration using @Configuration classes. He'll then compare and contrast this approach with XML-based configuration and follow up with a discussion of the new testing support for bean definition profiles. Next, attendees will see how testing server-side code with annotated controllers and client-side code with the RestTemplate just got a whole lot easier with the new Spring MVC test support. Come to this session to see these new Spring testing features in action.

Sam Brannen is a Senior Software Consultant with over 14 years' experience and co-founder of Swiftmind, a software consulting agency in Zürich, Switzerland. At Swiftmind Sam helps international clients achieve best practices in agile software development, architecture, design, implementation, and testing of enterprise Java applications using the Spring Framework and a plethora of open source technologies. In his consulting role, Sam most enjoys leading workshops, code reviews, coaching, and training clients. Sam is a popular speaker at conferences on Java, Spring, and OSGi. He is also an active core committer for the Spring Framework, lead author of ""Spring in a Nutshell"" from O'Reilly, author of the Spring TestContext Framework, and was previously a core developer of SpringSource dm Server (a.k.a., Eclipse Virgo).


Over the years, Sam has helped clients build applications in various business sectors ranging from e-commerce to banking, retail, automotive, and social communities. When not in front of his computer, Sam enjoys traveling and spending time with family and friends.

15:30 - 15:50
Coffee Break
Strict deadlines, budgets “on a diet”, exploding KLOC, CC, RFC metrics, lots of technologies, paradigms and manifests. Remote teams, extremely large and complicated “nonsense” systems. In the time of the global financial crisis are we also witnessing (or maybe we are the cause) our a crisis in our own sector? A crisis that has far more consequences.

During this presentation we will try to understand what exactly is an IT systems architecture crisis, what is it caused by and what consequences does it bring. We will also try to look beyond our own backyard to find solutions using “system based thinking” and “complex systems theory”. We will take a closer look at systems archetypes, at the characteristics of “complex systems” and we will try to find out what solutions do they offer. Can we really guess what the author had in mind while analyzing code lines and make our system more efficient without paralyzing our brain functions? Can the knowledge of features of systems’ hierarchy or sources of the so called “emerging behaviors” help us avoid problems in the future? Maybe instead of learning new programming languages or paradigms that will fade over time or turn out to be incomplete, we should dedicate our time to study the nature of things? The nature of “systems” and their “complexity”
Jarosław Pałka has been working in the IT field for 10 years. Nowadays he has little to do with application development, deploying new versions and problems with systems production. Most of the time he is preoccupied with promoting tools, technologies and programming methodologies. However during the evening he starts up his favorite editor and experiments with dynamic languages, EIC patterns and CEP (Complex Event Processing) solutions.
17:25 - 17:35
Conference Summary - Prize Drawing